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On Scotland voting ‘No’ to Independence

On Scotland voting No to Independence

I haven’t been posting here about Scottish Independence, but not because it’s not important to me as a Scot, but because it’s SO important that this entire issue has been a giant mass of stress for me.

The problem which made the topic so frustratingly stressful has been how much purposeful uncertainty was created around what would actually happen, complicated by the fact that there has been NO unbiased source on the matter. On the one hand you had the SNP and their understandably optimistic manifesto, which showed how they WANTED it to work, but came across, as most manifestos do, as unrealistically optimistic. This isn’t really a criticism of them, it’s not surprising that they wanted to stress the positive benefits of Independence, but I felt a definite lack of a more balanced and reasonable approach to pro-independence rhetoric that seemed less free of wishful thinking.

On the OTHER hand, there was a slew of exceedingly biased, often underhanded and purposefully obstructive and scare-mongering drivel from the media and from pro-union politicians. The media in particular failed to attain any kind of unbiased or balanced perspective, being as far as I saw nearly united in supporting the union and slandering the SNP. The BBC in particular stand out as SHAMEFULLY underhandedly biased. I’ve long noticed how since the SNP got into power the BBC news has been ignoring the Scottish parliament, but this really showed their true colours. They are supposed to be ‘impartial’ but actually did things like ignoring pro-independence protests, pretending an orange march was a ‘pro-union protest’ and, most shamefully, editing out SNP answers to questions and pretending they didn’t have answers. They should be in serious trouble for that last thing in particular. Really, our media in general is in dire need of reform.

And then there’s the pro-Union politicians. It’s not surprising, really, that they would want to be obstructive and create uncertainty over the important issue of currency and the EU, but it really made it difficult to know the truth of what would happen post-independence. SNP saying ‘we can do this way’ and the UK government saying ‘no you can’t’ made it so uncertain what would actually happen with the currency  in the event of independence, given that what would happen with it would require the co-operation of the Westminster government. The EU issue was similarly purposefully left vague. There was basically a very effective fog of confusion and obstruction created surrounding what would actually happen in the event of independence.

All in all, given the extremely strong pressure put upon us all by the media to vote ‘no’, the massive uncertainty about key issues, the lack of unbiased sources, and the fact no votes were expected originally to be much higher at the start of campaigning than they were at the end, I have to agree that it’s impressive so many of us voted yes.

I myself voted yes, despite feeling some fear and uncertainty about what would actually happen economically. I wanted independence, I certainly want more powers of self governance for Scotland. I wanted Scotland to be more protected from the harmful influence of Tory policy and rise of the awful UKIP. The SNP are the only popular party right now I can stomach listening to- the only one not afraid to stand up for fairness and equality and lay into the regressive policies of the Tories. Milliband is so pandering, cringing and toothless, a kind of pathetic Tory-lite rather than a proper alternative. Salmond and Sturgeon, even if I’m not fully in support of everything they say, are comparatively a breath of fresh air- they seem truly committed, they’re smart, and unafraid to be critical.

I’m really sad to hear Samond’s resigned. I hope he’ll be back, as he has been before. I’ve seen him go from talking at anti-war marches and anti-nuclear weapons marches to rising to be head of this country, and I believe that he has always been an exceptionally talented politician, with more behind him than a simple desire for power.

I just wasn’t sure if it would or wouldn’t work out, and in truth, I was scared of what would happen. Now that there’s been a no vote, I am definitely disappointed, it feels like we missed a really important chance, even if it was also a risk.

The important thing, as Nicola Sturgeon has said, is for the SNP and others to bounce back and press forwards for the promised increased powers we were offered in the event of a no vote, and to not let them forget that nearly half of all Scots wanted independence.

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lohrien:

Illustrations by Sieskja Albertine 

(via mindthelspace)

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decoarchitecture:

Kelenföld Power Station, Budapest, HungaryPhoto by Jennifer Walker, Slate
Jaw-dropping 1930s power station in Hungary.
From the article (which includes several more great images):

Hidden in Budapest’s XI District, on the banks of the Danube in the unfashionable side of Buda, lies an iconic monument symbolizing the dawn of the electrical age. Once Europe’s most advanced power station, the semi-abandoned and now privately owned site in Kelenföld celebrates its 100th birthday this year.
Kelenföld Power Station is not only a technological marvel, having supplied a large chunk of the city with electricity as far back as 1914, but it’s also one of the masterpieces in industrial design.
Two architects, Kálmán Reichl and Virgil Borbíro, designed the old buildings of the power plant, which under the Hungarian law means they will never be demolished, but neither will they be restored. You can see the slow decay in parts of the building, which only enhances their beauty in a bittersweet, tragic manner, since they will only continue to deteriorate over time. The old part of the Kelenföld Power Station is no longer supplying the city’s electricity, but it’s frequently used in films and music videos, most recently as a steampunk power room in NBC’s Dracula TV series.
(more)

decoarchitecture:

Kelenföld Power Station, Budapest, Hungary
Photo by Jennifer Walker, Slate

Jaw-dropping 1930s power station in Hungary.

From the article (which includes several more great images):

Hidden in Budapest’s XI District, on the banks of the Danube in the unfashionable side of Buda, lies an iconic monument symbolizing the dawn of the electrical age. Once Europe’s most advanced power station, the semi-abandoned and now privately owned site in Kelenföld celebrates its 100th birthday this year.

Kelenföld Power Station is not only a technological marvel, having supplied a large chunk of the city with electricity as far back as 1914, but it’s also one of the masterpieces in industrial design.

Two architects, Kálmán Reichl and Virgil Borbíro, designed the old buildings of the power plant, which under the Hungarian law means they will never be demolished, but neither will they be restored. You can see the slow decay in parts of the building, which only enhances their beauty in a bittersweet, tragic manner, since they will only continue to deteriorate over time. The old part of the Kelenföld Power Station is no longer supplying the city’s electricity, but it’s frequently used in films and music videos, most recently as a steampunk power room in NBC’s Dracula TV series.

(more)

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mstrkrftz:

Hazy fairytale (Explore #2, 27.11.2012) by Mathijs Delva
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stormingtheivory:

thecheshireone:

maguszeal:

for-the-other-shoe:

hobbitkaiju:

vrabia:

I lost it at The Backstreet Boys

why have I never heard of this person before

WHY DOESN’T THIS HAVE MORE NOTES

OMFG!

Enya made me spit my drink.

Still cannot believe that Strapping of all bands made it into this. Incredible.

Hahaha oh god, it helps that I liked so much nu-metal and indeed many of the band styles covered in this video, but I love this. Such talent! Also pleased Strapping Young Lad style was in it.

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trvl:

Private Moon by Leonid Tishkov

trvl:

Private Moon by Leonid Tishkov

(via daccorddecor)

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songesoleil:

Cathedral in Winter.1821. Oil on Canvas. 127 x 100 cm. Gemäldegalerie, Dresden, Germany.
Art by Ernst Ferdinand Oehme.(1797-1855).

songesoleil:

Cathedral in Winter.1821.
Oil on Canvas.
127 x 100 cm.
Gemäldegalerie, Dresden, Germany.

Art by Ernst Ferdinand Oehme.(1797-1855).

(via fyeahgothicromance)

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Forth Road Bridge Fireworks celebration and torchlit procession

Tonight was the culmination of quite a lot of celebration in these parts surrounding the 50th anniversary of the Forth Road bridge, sibling to the rather more impressive and famous Victorian Forth Rail bridge.

The fireworks display was quite possibly the most spectacular I’ve ever seen, since they had the whole of the bridge to launch them from. Earlier in the evening, visible as basically a thin orange line on the bridge in the last of the above photos, there was also a torchlit procession across it.

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littlelimpstiff14u2:

Minna Katriina aka Nokkasili

I don’t remember where I discovered this artist& the only information I could find on her is she is from Finland and sells her prints here: http://society6.com/nokkasili.

Her  work is really beautiful and I had to share! You can see her paintings and drawings on her tumblr
deviantART
Via

(via plurdledgabbleblotchits)

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tandemfatum:

I said I was going to work on my essay today but I couldn’t focus because I needed to get Steve Carlsberg feels out of my system
Now it’s 9 o’clock and I don’t have an essay so I’m going to go walk to Burger King write that essay

Just listened to the new episode, this is just a PERFECT Steve Carlsberg.

tandemfatum:

I said I was going to work on my essay today but I couldn’t focus because I needed to get Steve Carlsberg feels out of my system

Now it’s 9 o’clock and I don’t have an essay so I’m going to go walk to Burger King write that essay

Just listened to the new episode, this is just a PERFECT Steve Carlsberg.

Photo
centuriespast:

ACHENBACH, OswaldFireworks in Naples1875Oil on canvas, 66 x 102 cmThe Hermitage, St. Petersburg

centuriespast:

ACHENBACH, Oswald
Fireworks in Naples
1875
Oil on canvas, 66 x 102 cm
The Hermitage, St. Petersburg

Photoset

Skara Brae, Skaill bay, Orkney

Skara brae is an amazingly well preserved neolithic stone village in Orkney, occupied as early as 3000 BCE and in use for 600 years before its abandonment. It’s one of the best preserved neolithic sites that exist, thanks to its being preserved in a sand dune until a storm in 1850. It was pretty amazing seeing the stone furniture still intact in these little houses. They are also in a beautiful location just next to Skaill bay, although back when they were in use, the sea was not so near as it is now.

One of the strangest things to contemplate about the place for me is just how long they lived in this place- 600 years and so many generations, living and learning and working, with a culture we now know almost nothing about.

The 2nd last photo is inside a reconstruction of what the interior would have been like when in use. All the houses have this arrangement of cabinets/tables and beds at the side, with a hearth in the middle.

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Kinghorn

More of a local place I take many many photos of. The seal down the bottom was unusually seen off the shore of the beach above.

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(Source: vwnovelist, via museoftragedy)

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